Category: Stuttering

How to speak with people who stutter: do we need rules?

Some people are visibly uncomfortable when they meet someone who stutters. They might stare at the person, like a deer caught in headlights. Or they might look away, as if the person were a solar eclipse. Some people freak out...

/ 10 September 2017

Which books should I use in stuttering therapy with my child? Here are our favourite six kinds, with examples

“Help! I need some ideas!” A common – and understandable – request from parents and other carers when you work with children who stutter. Whether your child is doing the Lidcombe Program, the Westmead Program or a hybrid of the two,...

/ 26 May 2017

How to help teenagers who stutter (and their families)

Do you remember the joys of being a teenager? Growth spurts. Hormones amok. Peer-pressured to distraction. Painfully self-conscious: How do I look? Should I wear double denim? Is my hair cut okay? Will I fit in? Will they invite me?...

/ 8 May 2017

Lidcombe Program stuttering activities: Volume 2 printable activities for face-to-face and Skype therapy now available

When we published The Lidcombe Program for stuttering: my 10 favourite therapy activities back in 2014, we had no idea how popular it would be. Thousands of people from more than 20 countries have downloaded our free resource. Feedback has been...

/ 12 October 2016

School-age stuttering research update: mixing and matching treatments to get results

We need better treatments for school-aged children who stutter. Research groups, like the Australian Stuttering Research Centre (ASRC) and The Stuttering Center of Western Pennsylvania are working hard to develop and test new treatments. But front-line speech pathologists and families of...

/ 5 September 2016

Can I do stuttering therapy online via video calls?

Yes. From the comforts of a big city, it might not seem like there’s a shortage of speech pathologists with decent stuttering assessment and therapy experience. But there is. Too often, simple things have stopped people who stutter from getting...

/ 22 August 2016

Why does the Lidcombe Program for childhood stuttering work: a case of “words will never hurt me”?

The Lidcombe Program is an effective stuttering treatment for children under 6 years of age. Lidcombe Program treatment is 7.5 times more likely to reduce stuttering than natural recovery (Onslow et al., 2012). You can read more about the Lidcombe Program...

/ 21 June 2016

Not the naughty corner: time-out – a stuttering treatment for children and adults

Lots of stuttering treatments are behavioural therapies. Evidence-based examples include the Lidcombe Program for pre-schoolers who stutter and the Camperdown Program for adults who stutter. Some behavioural treatments – like the Lidcombe Program – are based on the idea of operant conditioning....

/ 29 February 2016

Stuttering treatments: what works for whom? An evidence update

Stuttering research – though voluminous, and growing – is notoriously hard to sift through and weigh for at least three reasons: with a few exceptions, different research groups tend to spend their time and funding researching and validating their own...

/ 9 November 2015

My child stutters. Is it because he’s shy? sensitive? hyper?

And why does my child’s stuttering get worse when she’s stressed out? Parents ask me sensible questions like these all the time, so I thought I’d post my thoughts here. Over the centuries, lots of researchers (and I use that...

/ 24 August 2015