(R704) Think, Then Write: Recounts

$10.00 including GST

This 28-page no-prep resource is designed to support students to write recounts.

First, we provide a simple scaffold or template that students can use to plan their recounts.

We then provide some models of elementary, simple and intermediate recounts.

Finally, we provide 10 recount cues supported by GIF-based video visuals and our recount scaffold to support students to plan then write their recounts.

To support people with additional language and learning needs, the cues feature topics that require a minimal amount of background knowledge, and the examples and scaffold are designed to help model and support students of all abilities.

Description

This 28-page no-prep resource is designed to support students to write recounts.

First, we provide a simple scaffold or template that students can use to plan their recounts. We then provide some models of elementary, simple and intermediate recounts. Finally, we provide 10 recount cues supported by GIF-based video visuals and our recount scaffold to support students to plan then write their recounts.

Recounts give people descriptions of events, often personally experienced, e.g. by recounting what happened at a party, on a family trip, or at school (e.g. Hill et al., 2021). If you recount an event, you tell or describe it to other people (Collins, 2022).

As with narratives (stories), most recounts are event-based. They are organised chronologically, and contain cause-and-effect and other logical relationships. Learning to write recounts is an important academic skill required by most curricula, especially in the early years. For example, students are often required to write personal accounts and speeches (or “news”) based on real-life events.

Recounts include information required to orient a listener or reader, e.g. information about who, what, when, where and why. They often include “signal” or “transition” words like “first”, “then”, ”next”, and “finally”; as well as time-signalling words like “before”, “after”, while, and “until”. 

To support people with additional language and learning needs, the cues feature topics that require a minimal amount of background knowledge, and the examples and scaffold are designed to help model and support students of all abilities.

Looking for additional structured writing resources?

If you haven’t done so already, please check out other volumes in the Think, Then Write Program: