(R512) Think, Then Write (Volume 1.7): Using ‘before’, ‘after’, ‘until’ to create complex sentences

$10.00 including GST

This no-prep workbook is recommended for practice between Volume 1 (complex sentences) and Volume 2 (paragraphs) of our Think then Write Program. It’s composed of 165 complex sentences to complete from sentence fragments.

For speaking, understanding, reading and writing, it’s useful to know how to write complex sentences using subordinating conjunctions related to time:

    • “before” (earlier than the date, time, or event mentioned);
    • “after” (later than the date, time, or event mentioned); and
    • “until” (happening during the period before the date, time or event mentioned and stopping after that time). 

To understand the differences in more detail, let’s practice completing identical sentence fragments using “before”, “after” and “until”. Available in PDF and Google Slides.

Description

Many programs teach students how to write different text types, like narratives, recounts and procedures. But all texts – regardless of their length and difficulty level – are composed of sentences. In our experience, many students (even in high school) lack the ability to link their ideas together and to express sophisticated thoughts and feelings in complex sentences.

Inspired by The Writing Revolution (Hochman & Wexler, 2017), this no-prep workbook is recommended for practice between Volume 1 (complex sentences) and Volume 2 (paragraphs) of our Think then Write Program. It’s composed of 165 complex sentences to complete from sentence fragments.

For speaking, understanding, reading and writing, it’s useful to know how to write complex sentences using subordinating conjunctions related to time:

    • “before” (earlier than the date, time, or event mentioned);
    • “after” (later than the date, time, or event mentioned); and
    • “until” (happening during the period before the date, time or event mentioned and stopping after that time). 

These words are very useful in essays because they help you to link your ideas and to express yourself more fluently. 

To understand the differences in more detail, let’s practice completing identical sentence fragments using “before”, “after” and “until”.

Available in PDF and Google Slides.

For more sentence generation, check out our:

If you haven’t done so already, please check out other volumes in the Think, Then Write Program:

In early 2022, we will publish Think, Then Write Volume 7: Planning Essays and Assignments.